Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Recommended Reading...

I love this book! I have read many of the Zone books and they all have valuable information, however, a lot of them are written from a scientific perspective which makes them a bit dry to read. "What to Eat in the Zone" keeps the information simple and easy to understand. I highly recommend buying this if you are interested in eating in the Zone. I would love to hear about any other great resources you have found...

7 comments:

Eva T. said...

ooh...i need this one!

Abhishek said...

Here is the Amazon link

http://www.amazon.com/What-Eat-Zone-Counter-Staying/dp/0060587423/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1214430802&sr=8-1

TexasPatrick said...

Does it have an expanded list of foods? I think at one time I looked everywhere for where mustard was on the list of things, I know I've seen like three different block counts for beer (I exaggerate, but not much.) :-)

Darcy D2 said...

Bought this book last night and started reading it once I got home. I like it a lot thanks for the tip

Skip said...

TexasPatrick,
I found this on the main Zone site.

Mustard I believe can be treated as vinegar. Its core ingredient (besides ground mustard seed) is vinegar. Of course sweet and sour mustards will have sugar added. This should go for regular yellow mustard and Grey Poupon type mustards.

With that I would assume a small amount (1 tbls.) would not even be counted. Perhaps Michele would know more.

michele said...

Skip and texaspatrick,

Generally speaking unless a food contains enough to equal one block you should not count it as a block. Barry Sears will tell you to round up or down depending upon how close an amount is to equaling a block. It is not an exact science, but the best we have at this point! As far as the expanded food list goes it has an expanded list of prepared foods, but some of the other Zone books have better general lists--also check the website.

TexasPatrick said...

No problem. I had almost come to the same conclusion on spices of any variety. I figured for the most part that spices are carbohydrate, but are usually in such minute quantities per each recipe that really unless they are substantial (say like in chili or mustard) then for the most part I would ignore them, as you say. The reason I would ignore is that there is some cushion built into even the definition of say "half an apple" i.e. there's some tolerance in the system. Obviously that's a lot of words to come to the same conclusion, but I appreciate the help. Hope to see some of you at the games.
TP


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